#SiDI says

Wearing socks in the dance studio might not be a good idea…

The interaction of dance footwear with the floor is important: the sole of the shoe and the surface of the floor need to complement one another to avoid injury.

Similarly, working barefoot needs to have a sympathetic floor. Although many dancers love wearing socks for comfort and often think wearing them allows better technical work through the feet, it’s best not to always rely on socks. A large number of dancers regularly practicing in socks, will effectively polish the dance floor surface, resulting in slippery patches.

There is also an increased risk of tripping and slipping when wearing socks as they affect the amount of traction gained from the floor.

Ideally, the use of socks for everyday practice should be avoided, especially for inexperienced dancers and beginners.

#SiDISays

#SiDI Says

Remember in this cold weather the temperature in your dance studio is important so that your dancers do their best.

To make sure that dancers can work efficiently and safely, the temperature of a dance studio should be around 18° to 24° degrees Celsius.  An ideal temperature would be around 20°-21° degrees Celsius.  This will help dancers to avoid either overheating or not being able to warm-up and stay warm efficiently, both of which can contribute to ill effects and injury.

Make sure that all your dancers keep their warm up clothes on longer in this cold weather so that muscles can be fully warm.

#SiDISays

New App Helps Dancers Locate Specialist Healthcare and Advice

Dance Longer Dance Stronger announces the launch of a new app designed especially to enable performers to locate – at the touch of a button – a range of specialist healthcare and reliable resources, right across the UK.

The Performers Health Hub app brings together the most up-to-date information about dance specific healthcare, both private and NHS, together with reliable, evidence-based resources in an easy to use format.

The app has been developed in response to the high injury rate among dancers and the lack of time available due to the nature of their work, to conduct thorough research in locating top quality healthcare.

Around 80% of all dancers will suffer an injury each year through training, rehearsal of performance* or as a result of fatigue and overwork, insufficient warming-up or cooling-down, recurring injury or not being able to respond to the early warning signs of injury**.

Due to the nature of their work, and the demands of their complex schedules, dancers, teachers and choreographers can find it extremely challenging to find the sufficient time needed in order to locate reliable, dance specialist care and resources. This can lead to many dancers abandoning the search altogether and working through an injury.

This is where the Performers Health Hub comes in.

Homepage

The app will house up-to-date information about specialist healthcare, and reliable, evidence-based resources on a range of health topics including fitness, first-aid for dancers, nutrition and hypermobility, and will take the user to the information they need via a few simple questions.

Director of Dance Longer Dance Stronger Claire Farmer comments: ‘By housing this vital information in one place, the app removes the need to spend precious time searching the internet and attempting to establish the quality and reliability of the information available there. Dancers can quickly find dance specialist healthcare practitioners and clinical services, providing the expert knowledge that can help dancers then return to the studio quicker.’

Resources on the Performers Health Hub are drawn from a consortium of organisations at the forefront of dance medicine and science research and advocacy including National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science, One Dance UK, Safe in Dance International and British Association for Performing Arts Medicine and will be continually updated as research progresses.

We are already looking to the future for the Performers Health Hub, with plans to add USA specific healthcare over the next 6 – 8 months and add further countries in future, allowing performers to refer to one app when on tour. To download the app please visit the Apple or Google stores.

Disclaimer: The information on this app is not intended to diagnose an injury. If you are concerned about an injury please always consult a registered healthcare professional. To query any of the information highlighted in this app please contact the organisation or author directly.

For more information contact: Claire Farmer MSc info@dancelongerdancestronger.com

www.dancelongerdancestronger.com
Facebook: @dancelongerdancestronger
Twitter: @dancestronger

Ankle injury bw

First fully registered University Provider

We are pleased to announce we have another new registered provider to tell you all about –

From the 13th March 2017 the first fully registered University Provider; Coleg Sir Gar in partnership with the University of Wales Trinity Saint David will be providing the Healthy Dancer Certificate as part of their BA Dance Course.

The Healthy Dancer Certificate allows individual dancers, working in any genre or style to show how their own practice is informed by healthy dance principles. It deals with you as a dancer, in training or as a professional, maintain your unique dancing body in order to optimize your performance and minimise the risk of injury.

You will increase your awareness of how the body works biomechanically to promote good alignment, discover how good injury awareness and management can help you to deal with injury, why proper nutrition and hydration is important for you to maintain health and performance while you dance and the impact of psychological factors that may influence or compromise your ability to work safely.

Good luck to all students taking this module in March and we look forward to hearing how you all got on.

If you are a University or College and are interested in embedding the Certificate within your university or college programme, please contact us to discuss this – maggie@safeindance.com

New Registered Provider – CANADA

Hannah Etlin-Stein is a Toronto based dance science consultant, Pilates and Strength and Conditioning coach. She completed her BFA in Dance from York University in 2010, and following that taught dance technique and creative dance movement in a studio setting. Hannah then completed a Masters degree in Dance Science from Trinity Laban. She has worked as an associate lecture at Buckinghamshire New University and Middlesex University and guest lectured at University of Roehampton and University of Suffolk. Hannah focuses her work on supplementary training for dancers and posture and alignment with a focus on the use of imagery and visualization. She has worked with athletes and dancers in the UK and Canada from recreational to professional levels developing training programs and corrective exercise programs to both manage and prevent injury, and optimize performance.

Hannah is actively involved with the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science, and is currently the social media coordinator for Healthy Dancer Canada. Hannah is currently in her final term of study to become a Registered Massage Therapist from Sutherland-Chan School of Massage Therapy.

She is currently planning courses in TORONTO.

Welcome to the team Hannah.
Hannah Etlin-Stein

To find a registered provider near you, please click on the following link:

Current Registered Providers

or to find out how to become a registered provider, click on this link:

How to become a Registered Provider

Download our Flyer in French Here

In the light of our new partnership with Healthy Dancer Canada and an increasing interest in our certification in France, we have translated our flyer into French and it is now available to download here.

Thank you Agathe DuMont, our intern in 2015, who also helped us with this.

NEWS – New Partnership – Healthy Dancer Canada, The Dance Health Alliance of Canada

We are delighted to announce an exciting new partnership with Healthy Dancer Canada. Together we will work towards our aligned missions to improve safe, effective and healthy dance practice among the dance community, healthy professionals and researchers.
Since the announcement of our partnership, there has been much interest in the Healthy Dance Certificates in Canada. Both HDC and our two registered providers in Canada are working to promote the work that we both do.

Maggie Morris of SiDI said “ We are so thrilled to be announcing this new partnership, we know the good work of Healthy Dance Canada and are looking forward working with them.”

Andrea Downie, President Healthy Dancer Canada said “Healthy Dancer Canada (HDC) and Safe In Dance International (SiDI) are committed to working together towards our common vision of healthy dance practice. SiDI’s Healthy Dance Certificates align with HDC’s mission to foster and facilitate communication and collaboration within the dance community to achieve our vision.”

We look forward to a long and fruitful relationship.

For more information on our work in Canada email maggie@safeindance.com
For more information on Healthy Dancer Canada visit www.healthydancercanada.org

Dancer health and safety. Applying knowledge early to help forge a long-lasting career

One Dance UK’s magazine includes an article written by one of our own; Maggie Morris.

The physical benefits and career advantages of healthy dance practice are becoming increasingly understood by every sector of the dance community in the UK.

If you can’t get your hands on a copy of the magazine you can see the full article in the attached pdf, let us know what you think.

One Dance UK_One Issue 1 p45

If you do not get the One Dance UK magazine and live in the UK you can become a member.

One Dance UK is the national voice for the dance profession. It aims to improve the conditions in which dance is created, performed and experienced. When you join you will also receive a subscription to their magazine. Click on the following link to join now One Dance UK